Artemis Fowl: Book of the Week!


Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer


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This week’s Thinking in English book of the week is Artemis Fowl. The book is also available as a graded reader (a book designed to help English learners practice and develop reading skills).

When I was younger, one of my favourite books was Artemis Fowl by Eoin Colfer. The book is aimed at younger readers, but this means that the original version has relatively simple vocabulary and grammar.

Artemis Fowl is a 12 year old boy, and a criminal mastermind. In the book, he hatches a plan to steal all of the gold from fairy land and must avoid the magical police’s attempts to stop him. Artemis Fowl is a hilarious and exciting story, with likeable characters and a very imaginative version of fairies, dwarves and trolls. These magical creatures are not the usual creatures found in books; they have guns and are ready to fight! Although it is a children’s book, this doesn’t mean that adults won’t like it too!

I’ll leave links to both the original and Penguin graded reader version at the bottom of the review! The graded reader version of the book is ranked as Level 4 which A2 + on the CEFR scale. So, it is right between beginner and intermediate level.

The original version of the book is obviously a little more difficult, but it is aimed at children between 10 and 14 years old so don’t be scared to try the native English version!

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Are you going to read the book? What books do you recommend for English learners? Let us know in the comments!


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